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FAQs Adoption

General

  • Q. This seems like a huge undertaking as I live thousands of miles away. Where do I even start?

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  • A. Have a look at the Adoption section of this website and email our Team member who will be able to put your mind at rest. Some of your concerns may be answered in the replies to the questions below. If you haven't owned a cat before we recommend that you read the Notes to the Adoption Questionnaire which details the cost and commitment involved in keeping a cat

 

  • Q. I can adopt a cat from my local animal charity, why should I choose one from Egypt?

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  • A. Whilst it's true that, particularly at this time, there are many local cats looking for homes, most (but not all) are funded by prominent charities which have the funds to undertake national advertising campaigns. As they are so large many devote a substantial amount of donations to administrative costs. Cairo Cat Rescue & Rehoming Champions use all of their donations to provide food, shelter and health care for their cats. What's more they do not euthanise animals based on judgments about their age or health issues. By adopting from Cairo Cat Rescue & Rehoming Champions you are enabling them to help yet another injured or abandoned animal

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  • Q. Why from Egypt?

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  • A.  Like many countries, Egypt has always had a large population of street cats. However, the war in Ukraine has substantially increased the cost of food since Egypt has always been reliant on Ukrainian exports of grain. Many people now have insufficient money to feed their animals and are abandoning them in pet shops or putting them onto the streets. The problem is critical with some rescues housing up to 600 cats

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  • Q. Why is my cat so expensive when I can buy a non-pedigree cat for about £50 from places like Pets4Homes?

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  • A. The cost of your cat is the cost of the airfare and associated requirements, nothing else. We make no profit from the adoption of a cat. Your money is used to fund yet another cat's journey to a new home. As explained above, the costs of food, healthcare and shelter for our cats is funded from donations and from people who subscribe to charity contributions from organisations such as easyfundraising.org.uk which costs 'donors' nothing. 

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  • Q. I've owned cats for years, do I really need a home check?

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  • A. Home checks are now carried out by most cat adoption agencies. It's true that they're mostly aimed at prospective new owners, but a quick home check (usually by video) helps us to get to know you and also to make sure that the particular cat you've selected will fit in well with your human and feline family. It also helps you put a face to the name of the person with whom you're dealing.

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  • Q. I've owned cats for years, do I really need to fill in your Questionnaire

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  • A. Again this is now a standardised request from most animal adoption agencies and should be quick and easy to complete

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  • Q. Can I adopt more than one cat at the same time

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  • A. Yes!! Many of our cats have formed an attachment to another cat. We always like to re-home them with their feline friends

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  • Q. What age do I have to be to adopt a cat?

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  • A. The legal age at which you can adopt a cat in the UK is 16. However, if you are still living at home we strongly suggest that you do so with your parents' permission. Whether you live at home or not please remember it's a huge commitment and you will be responsible for the wellbeing of your cat for its life, which could be up to 20 years.  A lot could happen in your life over that time

Your  Cat

  • Q.  How do I know it will be healthy?

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  • A.  The heath of all our cats is our priority. We wouldn't release a cat to you if we believed it not to be in the best of health. The exception of course is our special needs cats which adopters are happy to adopt with a pre-existing condition 

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  • Q.  Will its vaccinations be up to date?

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  • A.  Our cats receive regular health checks and vaccinations. See our Facebook page for details of vet visits

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  • Q.  Will I get a record of my cat's vaccinations?

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  • A.  Yes - in its Pet Passport

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  • Q. Will it be neutered?

  • A.  All our cats are neutered

  • Q.  Will it be housetrained?

  • A.  Unless it is a special needs cat all our cats are litter trained

  • Q.  Is my cat used to living with other animals or has it been living in a cage like at the RSPCA?

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  • A.  The cats roam free in our large accommodation which they also share with three dogs. There are, however, some cats which for various reasons prefer to be separate from other animals. We will indicate to you whether the cat you have chosen likes cats and/or dogs. It is for you to judge of course whether your dog will like cats 

  • Q.  Am I allowed to have a cat if I have children?

  • A.  We address this issue in more detail in the Notes to the Adoption Questionnaire but we have no rule barring those who have children from adopting one of our cats. Again it is for you to judge whether the cat you have chosen would fit in with your family, especially if the children are very small. We can advise you on this.

  •  Q.  I live in a flat. Can I have a cat?

  •  A.  Unless you have a ground floor flat with a garden you would have to have an indoor cat. Some people find litter trays a chore so it's something which needs consideration unless you are prepared to undertake litter duties for the life of the cat

  • Q.  Why do you recommend that some cats be indoor only

  •  A.  There are a variety of reasons why some cats are not suitable for an outdoor life. Some may have had a traumatic experience on the streets, some breeds, like Egyptian Maus, have absolutely no road sense and wouldn't survive a week anywhere near a road

  • Q.  I work all day and live alone. Can I still adopt one of your cats?   

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  • A. Certain breeds of cats, and certain individual cats, are more suited to being left alone for long periods than others. Egyptian Maus, for example, love human company and can become extremely unhappy if their owner is away for some time. One solution of course is to have more than one cat (providing the two get on) but it is an issue which requires a lot of consideration. For example, if you work long hours will you really have time to give some attention to your cat, however good your intentions? If you can't give it attention, what is the point of adopting it? There are some cats, like Maine Coons and British Shorthairs, which prefer a more solitary existence, but even they like a cuddle at the end of the day.

  • Q. How much will it cost to feed a cat?

  • A. See our Notes on Adoption Questionnaire

  • Q. How much will vet bills be?

  • A. See our Notes on Adoption Questionnaire

  • Q. What if I decide I can't keep the cat for any reason?

  • A. Please contact us and we will help you to arrange re-homing for it. Don't hesitate to do this. We make no judgment as to why it has not worked out. We want the best for both of you     

  • Q. Do some cats take a lot of maintenance, like grooming?

  • A. If you've looked at this website and Instagram you've probably realised that we have a number of Shirazi Persian cats and they are very popular with adopters. These cats do require a lot of grooming  and you will receive advice from us on their maintenance requirements. It is something to seriously consider

  • Q. Can I adopt a kitten?

  • A. If you choose to adopt one of our adorable kittens then be aware that you are unlikely to get it at the normal age of 16 weeks. This is because, understandably, organisations such as DEFRA in the UK insist on Rabies vaccinations and a period of 12 weeks has to elapse after the jab before they are considered to be fully vaccinated. So once you have chosen your kitten you need to build this into the time lapse before it can be imported

  • Q. What about FIV? If I adopt an FIV can how long is it likely to live and can it live with other cats  which either do or don't have FIV? 

  • A. Latest research has shown that FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus ) is often not a life-limiting condition and that there is little risk to an FIV cat infecting other cats unless they get involved in a cat fight. We will offer you advice on the care of FIV cats but suggest that you also do your own research - there are a lot of good articles on the web. In other words, there is no longer the fear once associated with mixing FIV cats with cats without the disease though because their immune system is weak they will need extra care.

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